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About

Mission Statementour-mission-photo

Baltimore Healthy Start, Inc. is committed to reducing infant mortality by utilizing a Life Course Perspective for improving the health and well-being of women and their families through the provision of comprehensive, supportive services offered in the communities where they live.

We Believe in Investing in Baltimore’s Families

ProgramsIn 1991, our founders had the vision to partner with the federal government and become part of the original 15 Federal Healthy Start demonstration sites across the country to tackle disparities in perinatal health, including infant mortality. Baltimore Healthy Start, Inc. has been a leader in raising awareness on how social determinants of health- access to health insurance, education, job opportunities and a safe living environment- impact health and drive inequities in health outcomes.

 

Our vision is simple

We want everyone to start healthy and stay healthy. We know that by experiencing a nurturing, caring, and fulfilling home life, every child will be eager to grow, motivated to succeed, and committed to making a difference in their community.

We improve the health of our families and communities in the following ways:

  1. Family and Community Engagement 
  2. Wellness Services
  3. Community Health Worker Deployment- Home Visiting
We provide 99% of our services wherever the family needs it: their doorstep, home or hospital. Bringing the services directly to families ensures that children have a safe, nurturing, thriving environment for the first few years of life — and beyond.

In 1991, our founders had the vision to partner with the federal government and become part of the original 15 Federal Healthy Start demonstration sites across the country to tackle disparities in perinatal health, including infant mortality. Baltimore Healthy Start, Inc. has been a leader in raising awareness on how social determinants of health- social, economic and policies- impact health and drive inequities in health outcomes. In fact 40-70% of Health Disparities in the US are caused by social determinants of health driven inequities. Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Resources that improve quality of life can have a significant influence on population health outcomes. Examples of these resources include health insurance, access to quality health services, lead free as well as safe and affordable housing, access to education, and availability of healthy foods. 

Baltimore Healthy Start, Inc. began by delivering resources to families at their doorsteps and in their homes. We continue this tradition today and expanded to provide additional services such as GED classes, Parent Leadership groups and Belly Buddies in our full service location on the east side. In 2011, we added Healthy Families America to promote child well-being and prevent abuse and neglect through intensive home visiting.

As the largest home visiting partner  with B’More for Healthy babies we are proud to be part of the movement that has helped drop the Baltimore City Infant Mortality Rate for the third year in a row following the initiation of B’more for Healthy Babies in 2009.

  • The 2012 IMR was 9.7 – the first time Baltimore City’s infant mortality rate has dropped below 10.0bmore-healthy-babies-logo
  • The overall infant mortality rate decreased by 28% from 2009 to 2012
  • The racial disparity between white and black infants decreased by almost 40% from 2009 to 2012

The drop in the infant mortality rate in Baltimore City plays a significant role in the overall drop in IMR for Maryland because of the large proportion (1/5) of infants who die each year in the City. In 2012, Baltimore City infant deaths (88) accounted for 20% of overall deaths in Maryland.

Healthy Start grants are provided to communities with rates of infant mortality at least 1½ times the U.S. national average and high rates for other adverse perinatal outcomes (e.g., low birthweight, preterm birth, maternal morbidity and mortality) in order to address the needs of high-risk women and their families before, during, and after pregnancy. 

Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Conditions (e.g., social, economic, and physical) in these various environments and settings (e.g., school, church, workplace, and neighborhood) have been referred to as “place.” In addition to the more material attributes of “place,” the patterns of social engagement and sense of security and well-being are also affected by where people live. Resources that enhance quality of life can have a significant influence on population health outcomes. Examples of these resources include safe and affordable housing, access to education, public safety, availability of healthy foods, local emergency/health services, and environments free of life-threatening toxins.